BLOG

Blocking mail to spamcop.net

Josh reports mail from MobileMe to spamcop.net addresses is being filtered somewhere and isn’t being delivered or actively bounced. He asserts that Apple is blocking all mail to Spamcop addresses

because they were having problems getting blacklisted on SpamCop and implemented this as a way of reducing their number of SpamCop spamtrap hits.

That makes no sense. Spamcop spamtraps are rarely hosted on spamcop.net. I won’t say never because there may be some, but I know that some spamtraps are on different domains and different SMTP servers. Senders who try to avoid Spamcop problems by filtering all mail to Spamcop are doomed to failure.

The problem is being discussed both on the Apple forums and the Spamcop forums. There is some confusion about what is going on. Some posters seem to be having problems mailing addresses at spamcop.net addresses, other posters seem to be having problems forwarding spam to the spamcop reporting address.

One poster reported that Apple support is claiming that Spamcop is blocking mail from MobileMe. In response ae Spamcop admins posted:

SpamCop does not block ANY email at all that is sent to spam.spamcop.net addresses. We do not use our own blocking list. We might bounce emails to certain addresses, but we do not block anything that comes our way.

The same applies for the SpamCop Email Service. However, they do use greylisting, which delays acceptance from some servers until the server tries again. Continuing to try to deliver email is standard behavior for legitimate mail servers, but not for spammer servers, which only try once and give up.

I suppose it is possible that Apple is seeing the greylisting delay when they try to send mail to spamcop.net, cqmail.net, or cesmail.net addresses and thinks it is a rejection.

If the problem really is forwarding spam to the Spamcop reporting address, it could be Apple filtering outgoing mail to prevent spam from leaking out their servers. If the problem really is sending mail to Spamcop.net addresses it could be a bad interaction between MobileMe and Spamcop’s greylisting scheme. Without seeing the actual transactions between the two servers it is difficult to determine what is happening.

In any case, this demonstrates some of the challenges involved in troubleshooting mail problems. People are poking the system from the outside, but there seems to be some one along the line silently discarding email, leaving senders (and receivers!) in the dark about where the email went.

Comment:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • Blogging

    It's been a wild week here in the US. I have to admit, the current political climate is affecting my ability to blog about email. I've always said email is not life or death. And how can I focus on the minutia of deliverability when things are in such turmoil and uncertainty? There are many things I want to write about, including some resources for those of us who are struggling with the current administration and changes in the US. What we can do. What we must do.  It just takes work and focus I don't have right now.    1 Comment


  • Email trends for 2017

    Freshmail has published a list of email marketing trends for 2017 from some of their favorite experts. I am honored to be included. Go check it out!No Comments


  • AOL FBL change

    Reminder for folks, AOL is changing their FBL from address starting on Jan 17th. AOLlogoForBlogThe (in)famous scomp@aol.net is going away to be replaced by fbl-no-reply @ postmaster.aol.com. These messages will be signed with the d= mx.postmaster.aol.com. Time to update your scripts!No Comments


Archives