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Monthly Archives: June 2009

Update on FixOutlook.org campaign

Last week I mentioned that the Email Standards Project has started a website (FixOutlook.org) and a twitter campaign to pressure Microsoft to use a HTML compliant rendering engine for Outlook. Currently Outlook uses the HTML engine in MS Word and that engine is not fully compliant with of the HTML standards as published by W3C.org. […]

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Problems with Barracuda blocklist

Mickey documents a problem he encountered with the Barracuda blocklist and relisting happening after a delisting even when there was no mail being sent through the IP in question. I’ve not had much interaction with Barracuda or their blocklist so I don’t have many suggestions. If you have useful information, head over there and comment.

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Traveling again!

I’m headed off early tomorrow morning to help celebrate a friend’s wedding (Hi Al!). I’ll be back at work on Tuesday and blogging will be back on schedule.

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Email standards and formatting

There is a lot of buzz on twitter and the email blogs today about Microsoft’s decision to use the HTML rendering engine from MS Word in Outlook 2010 instead of the HTML rendering engine from Explorer. The people behind the Email Standards Project have set up FixOutlook.org and are asking people to join twitter to […]

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Guilty of violating CAN SPAM

Al Ralsky has long been known as “the king of spam.” He has a long history of spamming, suing ISPs who block his mail and refusing to provide him with connectivity. He was profiled in the Detroit Free Press based on his spamming activity more than 5 years ago. He also has a history of […]

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What a world!

One of the fascinating things on the Internet is how a few dedicated people can create free, or mostly free, resources that become an important part of infrastructure for companies around the world. Blocklists are one of the prime examples of this phenomenon. Almost all of the widely used blocklists started out as a resource provided […]

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Pizzanomics

Ben at Mailchimp has a very funny post about how pizza is a metric for how big your company is.

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Choosing Twitter over Email to engage customers

Eric Goldman has an interesting blog post over at hit Technology and Marketing Law blog comparing and contrasting twitter and email. One of the reasons he likes Twitter is that it gives him, the ‘subscriber’ (follower in Twitspeak) control. There’s no chance that the company will sell his data. And, if the company does tweet […]

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Y! and ARF

Someone twittered me a question about Y! and their ARF reports. Apparently the ARF header is not including AM/PM which is causing problems for some people. Yahoo is aware of the issue and looking into it. On a housekeeping note, sorry for the lack of postings this week. I’m still recoving from the trip and […]

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Live from MAAWG!

OK, so I’m not at MAAWG any longer and I can’t blog about what happens there even if I was. However, there is an article at PC World about the conference. I’ve been going to MAAWG conferences for many years now. Not every one, being a small company means that I can’t just take off […]

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  • AOL compromise

    Lots of reports today of a security problem at AOL where accounts are sending spam, or are being spoofed in spam runs or something. Details are hazy, but there seems to be quite a bit of noise surrounding this incident. AOL hasn't provided any information as of yet as to what is going on.4 Comments


  • ReturnPath on DMARC+Yahoo

    Over at ReturnPath Christine has an excellent non-technical summary of the DMARC+Yahoo situation, along with some solid recommendations for what actions you might take to avoid the operational problems it can cause.No Comments


  • AOL problems

    Lots of people are reporting ongoing (RTR:GE) messages from AOL today.  This indicates the AOL mail servers are having problems and can't accept mail. This has nothing to do with spam, filtering or malicious email. This is simply their servers aren't functioning as well as they should be and so AOL can't accept all the mail thrown at them. These types of blocks resolve themselves. 1 Comment


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