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DKIM implementation survey: prelim results

First off, I want to thank everyone who participated in the DKIM implementation survey. This week has been pretty hectic so far, so I haven’t had a chance to actually dig down into the data from the survey, but I thought I’d post some preliminary results.

The ESP survey had 45 respondents. 30% of those sent more than 15 million emails a month.

Of all the respondents: 40% are signing with Domain Keys, 51.1% are signing with DKIM.

Of all respondents: 79.5% are signing with Domain Keys and 78.8% are signing with DKIM to access services (whitelists or FBLs) provided by the ISPs.

50% of those not signing with Domain Keys are not doing so because customers have not requested it.  61% of those not signing with DKIM are not doing it because of technical difficulties with deployment.

The ISP survey had 16 respondents, with 37.5% handling less than 500,000 mailboxes and 18.8% handling more than 15 million mailboxes. 75% of respondents said they are not checking Domain Keys on inbound mail. 56% said they are not currently checking DKIM on inbound mail.

Only 10 ISPs answered the question if they plan to check either Domain Keys or DKIM.

  • 1 said they planned to check Domain Keys only
  • 3 said they plan to check DKIM only
  • 3 said they plan to check both
  • 3 said they plan to check neither

On a first pass it appears the ESPs are adopting domain authentication more aggressively than ISPs. It also appears one of the major driving factors in adoption was the Yahoo FBL being tied to DK/DKIM signed email.

Again, thank all of you for participating. I’ll have a more comprehensive analysis soon.

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