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Monthly Archives: October 2009

Canadian Law

A anti-spam bill was passed out of committee Monday in Canada. Other than chatting over drinks with a large contingent of Canadians, I haven’t followed the story too closely. However, Matt V. has a detailed summary of the bill at EmailKarma. Have a great weekend.

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A blast from the past

I’m sitting here watching Iron Chef (the real one, not the American version) and surfing around on SFGate.com. It’s a slow night catching up on all the news I’ve missed this week while off traveling. I see a link on the front page: “Web marketer ordered to pay Facebook $711M.” As I click I wonder […]

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Problems at Cox: Resolved

People mailing to Cox in the wee hours of this morning may have received a rejection message citing the Invaluement DNSBL. 554 IMP a.b.c.d blocked.  IPBL100 – Refer to Error Codes section at http://postmaster.cox.net for more information. I spoke with one of the folks at Cox and they said there was an error in the […]

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Why do you need so many IP addresses (part 2)?

In my last post I discussed the background as to why an ISP will require their users to use their IP address allocation efficiently. I also mentioned in passing that I’d discussed ESP address allocation with both ESPs and ISPs recently. The ESP was talking about assigning a couple of dozen IP addresses to each […]

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Why do you need so many IP addresses?

IP addresses aren’t an unlimited resource, not on the current version of the Internet anyway. There are only a limited number of them and, while some of the doom and gloom proclamations about us running out in the next year or two may be exaggerated, we are running low on them and should be conserving […]

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Dealing with blacklists

Al has a good post listing the top 5 things senders should remember when dealing with blacklists. One of the critical things to remember about blocklists is that they are an early warning sign. Sure, some of them are one crank and his cat and will not hurt your overall delivery. A sender may be […]

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How NOT to get your mail unblocked

My friend Barry™ contacted me earlier this week to rant about senders contacting him asking for blocks to be lifted. Do they think I’m stupid? That they can just lie to me? Really! A sender contacts me and tells me that their customers only send confirmation emails and I dig through our mail from them […]

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They are all Barry. Listen to Barry

Al has a guest post up from an ISP rep (now universally referred to as Barry) about senders contacting ISPs. It lists things senders do that Barry Don’t Like. Listen to Barry. There are also comments from various other Barrys in the comments. Those are worth reading, too.

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Matt Blumberg joins the DMA Board

Matt Blumberg, CEO of ReturnPath, announced on his blog today that he has joined the board of the DMA. The blog post is both an explanation of why he did it and an agenda for what he wants to accomplish. [O]ne outcome of the DMA’s recent proxy fight with Board member Gerry Pike is that […]

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Who are you and why are you mailing me?

I’ve mentioned here before that I use tagged addresses whenever I sign up for. This does help me mentally sort out what’s real spam and what’s just mail I’ve forgotten I’ve signed up for. Yesterday, I received and email from e-fense.com thanking me for my interest in their new product. The mail came to a […]

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  • AOL problems

    Lots of people are reporting ongoing (RTR:GE) messages from AOL today.  This indicates the AOL mail servers are having problems and can't accept mail. This has nothing to do with spam, filtering or malicious email. This is simply their servers aren't functioning as well as they should be and so AOL can't accept all the mail thrown at them. These types of blocks resolve themselves. 1 Comment


  • Fixing discussion lists to work with new Yahoo policy

    Al has some really good advice on how to fix discussion lists to work with the new Yahoo policy. One thing I would add is the suggestion to actually check dmarc records before assuming policy. This will not only mean you're not having to rewrite things that don't need to be rewritten, but it will also mean you won't be caught flat footed if (when?) other free mail providers start publishing p=reject.No Comments


  • Sendgrid's open letter to Gmail

    Paul Kincaid-Smith wrote an open letter to Gmail about their experiences with the Gmail FBL and how the data from Gmail helped Sendgrid find problem customers. I know a lot of folks are frustrated with Gmail not returning more than statistics, but there is a place for this type of feedback within a comprehensive compliance desk.No Comments


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