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DMARC makes it a year

Yesterday DMARC.org announced that in a year DMARC protects over 60 million mailboxes worldwide.

DMARC, which stands for Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting & Conformance, builds on previous email authentication advancements, SPF and DKIM, with strong protection of the author’s address (From field) and creating a feedback loop from receivers back to legitimate email senders. This makes impersonation of the author’s address difficult for phishers who are trying to send fraudulent email. Brands can use DMARC to easily notify email providers how to recognize and manage fraudulent mail, while also providing a means by which the receiver can report on fraudulent messages to the owner of the spoofed domain. Messages that pass DMARC validation will continue to be evaluated by the mailbox provider to determine ultimate placement of the message according to its spam-detection filters.

 DMARC is a framework that allows senders to specify authorized sources of mail and tell recipient ISPs what to do with mail if the authentication fails. It also creates a feedback mechanism so receivers can tell senders when authentication fails.

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