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Sending mail to the wrong person, part eleventy

Another person has written another blog post talking about their experiences with an email address a lot of people add to mailing lists without actually owning the email address. In this case the address isn’t a person’s name, but is rather just what happens when you type across rows on they keyboard.

These are similar suggestions to those I (and others) have made in the past. It all boils down to allow people who never signed up for your list, even if someone gave you their email address, to tell you ‘This isn’t me.” A simple link in the mail, and a process to stop all mail to that address (and confirm it is true if someone tries to give it to you again), will stop a lot of unwanted and unasked for email.

6 comments

  1. Tom Chiverton says

    LIkewise, I feel sorry for this guy http://bar.com/ :-)

  2. Al Iverson says

    Wow, that would make a hell of a spamtrap address.

  3. laura says

    Google is currently handling mail for none@none.com. I’m kinda wondering which blocklist that’s feeding.

    I did meet the guy who owned nobody.com. I mentioned using it as a trap and he rolled his eyes at me and told me that he’d had to turn off the MX because the incoming traffic levels were so high. We talked about the volumes, and at that time it would have been fairly expensive to buy hardware to handle that volume of mail.

  4. Dave Nelson says

    Requiring a login to unsubscribe via the preferences portal is one of my great pet peeves. I’ve seen plenty of big companies do it and it just shows how short-sighted people can be when it comes to maintaining a healthy list.

    1. laura says

      It’s also a CAN SPAM violation these days.

  5. Tom Chiverton says

    You should ask the nobody.com guy to donate an MX to Project Honey pot http://www.projecthoneypot.org/faq.php#d :-)

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