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That unsubscribe time of year

Like many people, I make purchases online. This usually means the vendor adds me to their mailing list. I normally don’t care, that mail all filters to my “commercial” folder (my own personal version of tabs) and I can browse it at my leisure.

At this time of year, though, email marketers go into a bit of overdrive and that folder fills with 20 – 30 or more emails a day. The volume is no so much of a problem, but it can get annoying to try and find mail I want in all the crud from random vendors.

In some cases, I don’t even know who the company is or why they have my address. Today’s example was a florist in Maryland. Eventually I figured out I’d purchased from them back in 2007 to send flowers to a colleague when her mother passed away. Apparently, they’re doing so badly they need every dollar they can find.

What it does mean, though, is that I unsubscribe from more mail in December than I do through the rest of the year. I don’t mind the occasional mail, even weekly is no big deal. But when that frequency drastically increases, or someone has not bothered to mail me for 5+ years, I just don’t want that mail anymore.

Dana Perino used the term ‘unsubscribe Tuesday

Yesterday was Cyber Monday & today is Unsubscribe Tuesday.Take a chill, marketers!.

For me, that Tuesday is extending into all of December.

2 comments

  1. Jose Argudo says

    This gives us an idea of how “fresh” those databases are kept and the well planned their frequency is in their email marketing campaign.

    Sending an email after 5+ years is quite useless, but think about their database, surely there are more cases like yours in that database, is the volume is big and many accounts are missing, or mark those emails as SPAM they would be having serious trouble.

    Not a well planned campaign…

  2. Mohammed says

    There is something called User Engagement Index. If there is no UEI for a user for x number of weeks, then it is not a good idea to keep that user on the list. Why trying to mail more and mess up IP/domain reputation? These days ISP’s always want to deliver mail to users who want mail from a marketer not the other way around.

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