ArchiveMarch 2014

Gmail image caching update

Late last year Gmail started caching images on their servers, breaking open tracking in some circumstances. This image caching was good for senders, in that images were back on by default. But it was also bad for senders because it broke dynamic content and didn’t allow for tracking of multiple opens by the same recipient. According to a new blog post by Moveable Ink this issue has now been...

Horses, not zebras

I was first introduced to the maxim “When you hear hoofbeats, think horses not zebras” when I worked in my first molecular biology lab 20-some-odd years ago. I’m no longer a gene jockey, but I still find myself applying this to troubleshooting delivery problems for clients. It’s not that I think all delivery problems are caused by “horses”, or that...

Best practices: A Gmail Perspective

At M3AAWG 30 in San Francisco, Gmail representatives presented a session about best practices and what they wanted to see from senders. I came out of the session with a few takeaways. Gmail spends a lot of time and energy on filtering mail and giving the user the absolute best inbox experience possible. Gmail does per-user filtering, probably more than any other ISP out there. Gmail filters are...

This month in email: February 2014

After a few months of hiatus, I’m resurrecting the this month in email feature. So what did we talk about in February? Industry News There was quite a bit of industry news. M3AAWG was in mid-February and there were actually a few sessions we were allowed to blog about. Gmail announced their new pilot FBL program. Ladar Levinson gave the keynote talking about the Lavabit shutdown and his new...

Does CAN SPAM apply to individual prospecting emails

Two different people on two different mailing lists asked very similar questions recently. Are people who send individual prospecting emails required to comply with CAN SPAM. My opinion (not a lawyer, don’t play one on TV, didn’t stay at a Holiday Inn last night) is that CAN SPAM does not mention anything about volume, and any individual unsolicited email that has a “primary...

ISP relations in a nutshell

Senders: You’re blocking our mail, why? Receivers: Because you’re spamming, stop spamming and we won’t block you. Senders: But we’re not spamming. What do you mean we’re spamming! How could we be spamming, we’re not sending spam! Receivers: You’re doing all these things (generating complaints, sending to dead accounts, hitting spam traps, not bounce...

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