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Tag: ISP

ISP relations in a nutshell

Senders: You’re blocking our mail, why? Receivers: Because you’re spamming, stop spamming and we won’t block you. Senders: But we’re not spamming. What do you mean we’re spamming! How could we be spamming, we’re not sending spam! Receivers: You’re doing all these things (generating complaints, sending to dead accounts, hitting spam traps, not bounce handling, […]

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Thoughts on “ISP relations”

I’ve been thinking a lot about the field of ISP relations and what it means and what it actually is. A few years ago the answer was pretty simple. ISP relations is about knowing the right people at ISPs in order to get blocks lifted. The fact that ISPs had staff just to deal with […]

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ISP Relationships

Delivra has a new whitepaper written by Ken Magill talking about the value (or lack thereof) of relationships with ISPs. In Ken’s understated way, he calls baloney on ESPs that claim they have great delivery because they have good relationships with ISPs. He’s right. I get a lot of calls from potential clients and some […]

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There is no bat phone

I don’t have much to add to Al’s post about the lack of people to call at different ISPs to get mail delivered. I will say there was a time some ISPs had staff that would deal with senders and blocking problems. But those positions have gradually been eliminated over the last 2 or 3 […]

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Hunting the Human Representative

Yesterday’s post was inspired by a number of questions I’ve fielded recently from people in the email industry. Some were clients, some were colleagues on mailing lists, but in most cases they’d found a delivery issue that they couldn’t solve and were looking for the elusive Human Representative of an ISP. There was a time […]

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Having the same conversation

This morning I was reading a blog post about the failure of the congressional super committee. The author commented parties can’t reach an agreement if they’re not even having the same conversation. I realized this is just as true in email as it is in politics. All too often we’re not having the same conversation. […]

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Mail that looks like spam

One thing I repeat over and over again is to not send mail that looks like spam. Over at the Mailchimp Blog they report some hard data on what looks like spam. The design is simple, they took examples of mail sent by their customers and forwarded them over to Amazon’s Mechanical Turk project to […]

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Optonline problems

I’m hearing from multiple sources that they’ve been having problems getting mail delivered to optonline.net, optonline.com and optimum.net all day. This appears to be affecting senders across the board, from ISPs to ESPs. It looks like something is not working right over there, and hammering retries doesn’t seem to be helping. The best recommendation is […]

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I’m on a blocklist! HELP!

Recently, an abuse desk rep asked what to do when customers were complaining about being assigned an IP address located on a blocklist. Because not every blocklist actually affects mail delivery it’s helpful to identify if the listing is causing a problem before diving in and trying to resolve the issue. Find out whether mail […]

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Why offer a feedback loop?

Someone asked yesterday What business advantage is there to an ISP in offering a feedback loop? I’ve never really seen one. It’s a good question. There’s a fair bit of work involved in offering, maintaining and supporting a feedback loop. What makes it worth it? At a consumer ISP there’s some email sent to customers […]

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  • AOL problems

    Lots of people are reporting ongoing (RTR:GE) messages from AOL today.  This indicates the AOL mail servers are having problems and can't accept mail. This has nothing to do with spam, filtering or malicious email. This is simply their servers aren't functioning as well as they should be and so AOL can't accept all the mail thrown at them. These types of blocks resolve themselves. 1 Comment


  • Fixing discussion lists to work with new Yahoo policy

    Al has some really good advice on how to fix discussion lists to work with the new Yahoo policy. One thing I would add is the suggestion to actually check dmarc records before assuming policy. This will not only mean you're not having to rewrite things that don't need to be rewritten, but it will also mean you won't be caught flat footed if (when?) other free mail providers start publishing p=reject.No Comments


  • Sendgrid's open letter to Gmail

    Paul Kincaid-Smith wrote an open letter to Gmail about their experiences with the Gmail FBL and how the data from Gmail helped Sendgrid find problem customers. I know a lot of folks are frustrated with Gmail not returning more than statistics, but there is a place for this type of feedback within a comprehensive compliance desk.No Comments


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