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Tag: Technical

The perfect email

More and more I’m moving away from consulting on technical setup issues as the solution to delivery problems. Delivery is not about the technical perfection of a message. Spammers get the technical right all the time. No, instead, delivery is about sending messages the user wants. While looking for something on the blog I found an […]

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May 2016: The Month in Email

Summer, already? Happy June! Here’s a look at our busy month of May. I had a wonderful time in Atlanta at the Salesforce Connections 2016 conference, where I spoke on a panel about deliverability. While in Atlanta, I also visited our friends at Mailchimp, and later spoke at the Email Innovations conference in Las Vegas, […]

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Pete and Repeat

Pete and Repeat were on a boat. Pete fell out, who was left? I was searching the blog for some resources today and these were the first two posts that showed up on the search results. I often feel like I’m repeating myself, but sometimes I am.  

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Check your tech

One of the things we do for just about every new client coming into WttW is have them send us an email from their bulk mail system. We then check it for technical correctness. This includes things like reviewing all the different From headers, rDNS of the connecting IP, List-Unsubscribe headers and authentication. This is […]

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PTR Records

PTR records are easy to over look and they have a significant impact on your ability to deliver mail without them.  Some ISP and mailbox providers will reject mail from IP addresses that do not have a PTR record created. PTR records are a type of DNS record that resolves an IP address to a […]

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AHBL Wildcards the Internet

AHBL (Abusive Host Blocking List) is a DNSBL (Domain Name Service Blacklist) that has been available since 2003 and is used by administrators to crowd-source spam sources, open proxies, and open relays.  By collecting the data into a single list, an email system can check this blacklist to determine if a message should be accepted […]

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M3AAWG Recommends TLS

SSL or Secure Sockets Layer is protocol designed to provide a secure way of transmitting information between computer systems. Originally created by Netscape and released publicly as SSLv2 in 1995 and updated to SSLv3 in 1996. TLS or Transport Layer Security was created in 1999 as a replacement for SSLv3. TLS and SSL are most […]

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The anatomy of From:

Compared with some of the more complex pieces of the email protocol the From: header seems deceptively simple. But I’ve heard several people be confused about what it’s made up of over the past couple of months, so I thought I’d dig a bit deeper into how it’s defined and how it’s used in practice. […]

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Horses, not zebras

I was first introduced to the maxim “When you hear hoofbeats, think horses not zebras” when I worked in my first molecular biology lab 20-some-odd years ago. I’m no longer a gene jockey, but I still find myself applying this to troubleshooting delivery problems for clients. It’s not that I think all delivery problems are caused […]

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Ad-hoc analysis

I often pull emails into a database to analyze them, but sometimes I want something simpler. Emails are typically stored in one of two ways: mbox format, where an entire mailbox is stored in a single file, and maildir format, where a mailbox is a directory with one file in it for each email. My […]

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  • Blogging

    It's been a wild week here in the US. I have to admit, the current political climate is affecting my ability to blog about email. I've always said email is not life or death. And how can I focus on the minutia of deliverability when things are in such turmoil and uncertainty? There are many things I want to write about, including some resources for those of us who are struggling with the current administration and changes in the US. What we can do. What we must do.  It just takes work and focus I don't have right now.    1 Comment


  • Email trends for 2017

    Freshmail has published a list of email marketing trends for 2017 from some of their favorite experts. I am honored to be included. Go check it out!No Comments


  • AOL FBL change

    Reminder for folks, AOL is changing their FBL from address starting on Jan 17th. AOLlogoForBlogThe (in)famous scomp@aol.net is going away to be replaced by fbl-no-reply @ postmaster.aol.com. These messages will be signed with the d= mx.postmaster.aol.com. Time to update your scripts!No Comments


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