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Category: Industry

Anon whois information

I’ve talked before about reasons not to hide commercial domains behind whois proxies. Al found another one: if you use a proxies you cannot list your domains with abuse.net. Al has a good write up of whois, and why this is important. So go there and read it.

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March 2014: The month in email

What did we talk about here on the blog in March? It seems we talked a lot about Gmail but also looked at some CAN SPAM issues. Gmail When it comes to innovating in the inbox, Gmail is leaps and bounds ahead of the pack. They made some improvements to their image caching process and […]

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Sendgrid’s open letter to Gmail

Paul Kincaid-Smith wrote an open letter to Gmail about their experiences with the Gmail FBL and how the data from Gmail helped Sendgrid find problem customers. I know a lot of folks are frustrated with Gmail not returning more than statistics, but there is a place for this type of feedback within a comprehensive compliance […]

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Domains need to be warmed, too

One thing that came out of the ISP session at M3AAWG is that domains need to be warmed up, too. I can’t remember exactly which ISP rep said it, but there was general nodding across the panel when this was said. This isn’t just the domain in the reverse DNS of the sending IP, but […]

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Gmail promotions tab improves for marketers

The official Gmail blog announced today that they’re testing a new way of displaying emails in the Promotions tab. This display method will show users a featured image instead of the normal subject line. Email marketers that want to take advantage of this should visit the Gmail developers pages for information on how to set […]

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Gmail FBL update

Last week Gmail started contacting ESPs that signed up for their new FBL with more information on how to set up mailings to receive FBL emails. One of the struggles some ESPs are having is the requirement for DKIM signing. Many of the bigger ESPs have clients that sign with their own domains. Gmail is […]

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Busy week

This week has been incredibly busy with business stuff and I’ve not had a lot of time to sit and think about blogging. Blogging will be light for the next few days while I catch up.

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Tech Talk Podcast

Last week I had the pleasure of sitting down and talking delivery and email with W. Jeffery Rice of Brickstreet software. He’s posted a review and the recordings at Brickstreet and the UR Business Network.

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Spammers make me laugh…

When they can’t work their spam ware. {rtf1ansiansicpg1252deff0deflang1033{fonttbl{f0fnilfcharset0 Calibri;}} {*generator Msftedit 5.41.21.2510;}viewkind4uc1pardsa200sl276slmult1lang9f0fs22 Dear Sir,par My clients wants to invest huge cash .Please do reply if interested no dime needed from you.par Regardspar john Gagapar }

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Gmail image caching update

Late last year Gmail started caching images on their servers, breaking open tracking in some circumstances. This image caching was good for senders, in that images were back on by default. But it was also bad for senders because it broke dynamic content and didn’t allow for tracking of multiple opens by the same recipient. […]

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  • ReturnPath on DMARC+Yahoo

    Over at ReturnPath Christine has an excellent non-technical summary of the DMARC+Yahoo situation, along with some solid recommendations for what actions you might take to avoid the operational problems it can cause.No Comments


  • AOL problems

    Lots of people are reporting ongoing (RTR:GE) messages from AOL today.  This indicates the AOL mail servers are having problems and can't accept mail. This has nothing to do with spam, filtering or malicious email. This is simply their servers aren't functioning as well as they should be and so AOL can't accept all the mail thrown at them. These types of blocks resolve themselves. 1 Comment


  • Fixing discussion lists to work with new Yahoo policy

    Al has some really good advice on how to fix discussion lists to work with the new Yahoo policy. One thing I would add is the suggestion to actually check dmarc records before assuming policy. This will not only mean you're not having to rewrite things that don't need to be rewritten, but it will also mean you won't be caught flat footed if (when?) other free mail providers start publishing p=reject.No Comments


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